Tag Archive: JAMA

Can an iPad Game Help Treat Lazy Eye in Children?

  2 years ago     469 Views     Comments Off on Can an iPad Game Help Treat Lazy Eye in Children?  

Lazy eye or amblyopia is one of the most common causes of visual impairment in children.  A new study looked at whether a special type of iPad game could be a new way to treat lazy eye. The standard treatment for amblyopia involves patching the opposite eye to force the affected eye to work harder.   Researchers from the Retina Foundation of the Southwest studied 28 children with amblyopia ages 4-10. The children were randomly assigned to two groups in a clinical trial, one that used the iPad game for treatment and one that used the standardized treatment of patching.…

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How the Prescription Opioid Epidemic is Affecting Children and Teens

  2 years ago     468 Views     Comments Off on How the Prescription Opioid Epidemic is Affecting Children and Teens  

From 1999-2010 retail sales of prescription opioids quadrupled. As more adults become dependent on these medications, children and teenagers are also at risk for poisoning and misuse. A new study looked at how often kids and teenagers were hospitalized for opioid poisoning over a sixteen-year period. Researchers from Yale School of Medicine reviewed the U.S. pediatric hospital discharge records of children and teens ages 1 to 19 from 1997-2012, identifying more than 13,000 children hospitalized for opioid poisonings.  They found that the hospitalization rates doubled overall.  The largest number of hospitalizations were among teenagers 15-19 while the highest rate of increase…

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Are Pregnant Women Who Have Had Bariatric Surgery at a Higher Risk for Birth Complications?

  2 years ago     410 Views     Comments Off on Are Pregnant Women Who Have Had Bariatric Surgery at a Higher Risk for Birth Complications?  

One in five women in the United States are obese at the time of conception. Obesity during pregnancy can increase the risk of complications for both mothers and infants, a common reason why younger women may explore the option of weight loss surgery. A new study examined the risks of prematurity, low birth weight and intensive care (ICU) admission for the infants of mothers who underwent bariatric surgery prior to pregnancy. Researchers from the University of Washington Medical Center studied the birth certificates and hospital discharge data of more than 10,000 mothers and infants in Washington state from 1980 to…

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Estrogen Blocking Drugs Can Decrease Risk of Breast Cancer

  2 years ago     444 Views     Comments Off on Estrogen Blocking Drugs Can Decrease Risk of Breast Cancer  

During the 10 years after breast cancer diagnosis, about five percent of women develop cancer in the opposite breast, known as contralateral breast cancer. According to a new study in JAMA Oncology, estrogen blocking drugs can decrease the risk of contralateral breast cancer, especially among women whose breast cancer was estrogen receptor positive. Researchers from the National Cancer Institute reviewed the records of more than 7,500 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from 1990 to 2008. They followed the women through 2011 to see which patients developed breast cancer in the opposite breast. The researchers also recorded who took tamoxifen…

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Early Stroke Treatment Improves Patient Outcomes

  2 years ago     483 Views     Comments Off on Early Stroke Treatment Improves Patient Outcomes  

After a large vessel stroke, how long does a patient have to get treatment in order to prevent long lasting effects? A new study in JAMA found that a shorter time to treatment after a stroke is critical to having the best recovery. Researchers from UCLA reviewed the outcomes of over 1200 patients experiencing acute ischemic stroke - some received standard medical therapy and others received standard therapy plus a thrombectomy device. The sooner the device, which pulls clots out of the affected artery, was used, the better the patient’s overall recovery. The window to make a difference in clinical…

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Use of Wearable Fitness Technology Does Not Improve Weight Loss

  2 years ago     401 Views     Comments Off on Use of Wearable Fitness Technology Does Not Improve Weight Loss  

Many Americans are turning to wearable fitness devices to help meet their fitness goals, however a new study reports that using this type of technology did not result in more weight loss among a group of obese and overweight young adults. Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh studied 471 overweight young adults who received counseling on diet and exercise from 2010 to 2012. Six months into the study, half were randomly assigned to the wearable device to help track physical activity and diet. They found that the group that did not use the wearable device lost about five pounds more…

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MRI Exposure During Early Pregnancy Not Harmful to Fetus

  3 years ago     486 Views     Comments Off on MRI Exposure During Early Pregnancy Not Harmful to Fetus  

  With growing use of medical imaging there are many questions about the safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the first trimester of pregnancy. A new study analyzed more than 1.4 million births that had exposure to MRI during the first trimester compared with nonexposure, and found there was no association of MRI and increased risk of harm to the fetus or during early childhood. However, MRI done with the contrast agent gadolinium at any time during pregnancy might be harmful and is associated with higher risk of fetal death as well as a variety of inflammatory and skin…

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Hospital Records Predict Risk of Suicide

  3 years ago     411 Views     Comments Off on Hospital Records Predict Risk of Suicide  

Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States and identifying those at risk can be challenging. According to a new study, certain words in hospital discharge notes may be one way to identify patients who are at an increased risk of suicide.   Researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital examined more than 450,000 patients’ discharge notes from 2005 to 2013. They analyzed these notes by using a sentiment analysis computer program which searches for positive or negative words. The researchers found that certain words like gloomy, unfortunate, and sad can predict a higher risk for suicide, as opposed…

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New Medication for High Cholesterol Not Cost-Effective

  3 years ago     455 Views     Comments Off on New Medication for High Cholesterol Not Cost-Effective  

The FDA recently approved a new class of cholesterol-lowering drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors.  These new medications could substantially reduce heart attacks, strokes and cardiovascular deaths, however they are very expensive.  A new study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of this therapy and how increased use might affect the U.S. healthcare system. Researchers from the University of California San Francisco used a simulation model that included all U.S. adults 35 and older and evaluated outcomes such as expected numbers of deaths due to cardiovascular disease, heart attacks and strokes, and balanced this with the cost and potential benefits of these drugs. With an…

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Reducing the High Cost of Prescription Drugs in the U.S.

  3 years ago     468 Views     Comments Off on Reducing the High Cost of Prescription Drugs in the U.S.  

The increasing cost of prescription drugs in the United States has become a source of growing concern for patients, prescribers, payers, and policy makers.  A new study examined the reasons for these high prices and also suggests policy changes that could help contain costs. Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital reviewed the medical and health policy literature on prescription drug prices in the U.S. and found high drug costs stem from various factors such as market exclusivity, limitations on payers and their ability to negotiate prices, and limitations on competition. The researchers state that the most realistic short-term strategies include…

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