Tag Archive: JAMA

Assessment of Deep Learning Algorithms For Detecting Breast Cancer Lymph Node Metastases

  1 year ago     529 Views     Comments Off on Assessment of Deep Learning Algorithms For Detecting Breast Cancer Lymph Node Metastases  

With artificial intelligence, computers learn to do tasks that normally require human intelligence.  A new study in JAMA reports on how accurate computer algorithms were at detecting the spread of cancer to lymph nodes in women with breast cancer compared with pathologists  

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Wealth-Associated Disparities in Death and Disability in the United States and England

  1 year ago     562 Views     Comments Off on Wealth-Associated Disparities in Death and Disability in the United States and England  

Although life expectancy has increased worldwide, differences in death rates among socioeconomic groups continue to grow in the United States and Europe. But are there differences in the relationship between wealth and health among older adults in the U-S, which has Medicare and Social Security, and in England where there is a national health care system? A new study in JAMA Internal Medicine looks at that question.

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Neighborhood Demographics and Cardiac Arrest Treatments and Outcomes

  2 years ago     559 Views     Comments Off on Neighborhood Demographics and Cardiac Arrest Treatments and Outcomes  

In a cardiac arrest, the heart suddenly stops beating. About 350,000 patients have a cardiac arrest outside the hospital each year in the United States. Only 8% to 10% survive and that number varies regionally. But does the racial make-up of a neighborhood influence the likelihood that a bystander will deliver CPR or use an electrical shock device known as a defibrillator to rescue the person, and does it influence survival from cardiac arrest?

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Home Monitoring of Blood Sugar Did Not Improve Glycemic Control After 1 Year

  2 years ago     482 Views     Comments Off on Home Monitoring of Blood Sugar Did Not Improve Glycemic Control After 1 Year  

Self-monitoring of blood glucose levels in patients with type  2 diabetes who are not treated with insulin did not improve glycemic control or health-related quality of life after one year in a randomized trial, results that suggest self-monitoring should not be routine in these patients, according to a new study.

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Findings Do Not Support Steroid Injections for Knee Osteoarthritis

  2 years ago     512 Views     Comments Off on Findings Do Not Support Steroid Injections for Knee Osteoarthritis  

Among patients with knee osteoarthritis, an injection of a corticosteroid every three months over two years resulted in significantly greater cartilage volume loss and no significant difference in knee pain compared to patients who received a placebo injection, according to a new study.  

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Study Examines Effectiveness of Steroid Medication for Sore Throat

  2 years ago     500 Views     Comments Off on Study Examines Effectiveness of Steroid Medication for Sore Throat  

In patients with a sore throat that didn’t require immediate antibiotics, a single capsule of the corticosteroid dexamethasone didn’t increase the likelihood of complete symptom resolution after 24 hours, and although more patients taking the steroid reported feeling completely better after 48 hours, a role for steroids to treat sore throats in primary care is uncertain, according to a study published by JAMA.

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The Effects of Testosterone Gel on Health Outcomes

  2 years ago     570 Views     Comments Off on The Effects of Testosterone Gel on Health Outcomes  

Can testosterone gel improve memory, correct anemia, increase bone density or prevent the growth of coronary artery plaque in older men with low testosterone levels? Four new studies in JAMA and JAMA Internal Medicine found improvement in some of these measures.  

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Can Mentally Stimulating Activities Reduce the Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults?

  2 years ago     521 Views     Comments Off on Can Mentally Stimulating Activities Reduce the Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older Adults?  

A new study in JAMA Neurology suggests engaging in brain-stimulating activities was associated with a lower risk of developing mild cognitive impairment in adults 70 and older. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is the intermediate zone between normal cognitive aging and dementia, so examining potential protective lifestyle-related factors against cognitive decline and dementia is important, according to the article. Playing games, crafting, using a computer and engaging in social activities were associated with a decreased risk of MCI in the study by Yonas E. Geda, M.D., M.Sc., of the Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz. The study included 1,929 adults who were followed up to…

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How Do Mortality Rates Vary Based On Where You Live?

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Research shows that disparities in life expectancy are increasing across different counties in the United States.  A new study looked at mortality data from 1980 to 2014 to see what kinds of geographic patterns exist. Researchers from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) in Seattle wanted to know what the leading causes of death were in each area and to determine trends over time by region. They examined death certificate data and found that differences across counties are increasing and that the main causes of death also vary by region. In the future, the authors plan to look…

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Decline in Prevalence of Dementia in the U.S.

  2 years ago     506 Views     Comments Off on Decline in Prevalence of Dementia in the U.S.  

A new study reported a decline in the prevalence of dementia in the United States between 2000 and 2012. Researchers from the University of Michigan studied more than 21,000 adults over the age of 65, using data from the Health and Retirement study from 2000 and 2012.  The overall prevalence of dementia decreased from 11.6% in 2000 to 8.8% in 2012.  The authors believe the decline is primarily due to two factors; an increase in baseline education level and better treatments for cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Although these factors may explain some of the decline, the…

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